Skip to content Skip to navigation

Research

Ecological Momentary Assessment in Behavioral Research: Addressing Technological and Human Participant Challenges

(Read Full Publication)

1Department of Health & Community Systems, University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
2Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
3University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
4Institute for Complex Engineered Systems, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
5Human Computer Interaction Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
6Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Georgia College of Public Health, Athens, GA, United States

Corresponding Author
Close
Corresponding Author:Lora E Burke, MPH, PhD

Department of Health & Community Systems
University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing
415 Victoria Building
3500 Victoria Street
Pittsburgh, PA, 15261
United States
Phone: 1 412 624 2305
Fax:1 412 383 7293
Email: lbu100 [at] pitt.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) assesses individuals’ current experiences, behaviors, and moods as they occur in real time and in their natural environment. EMA studies, particularly those of longer duration, are complex and require an infrastructure to support the data flow and monitoring of EMA completion

 

Beyond the Randomized Controlled Trial: A Review of Alternatives in mHealth Clinical Trial Methods

(Read Full Publication)

1Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
2Centre for Global eHealth Innovation, Techna Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada
3Centre for Addictions and Mental Health (CAMH), CAMH Education, Toronto, ON, Canada
4Faculty of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
5Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

Corresponding Author
Quynh Pham, MSc

Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health
University of Toronto
Health Sciences Building, 4th Floor
155 College St
Toronto, ON, M5T 3M6
Canada

Phone: 1 416 978 4326
Fax:1 416 978 4326
Email: q.pham [at] mail.utoronto.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have long been considered the primary research study design capable of eliciting causal relationships between health interventions and consequent outcomes. However, with a prolonged duration from recruitment to publication, high-cost trial implementation, and a rigid trial protocol, RCTs are perceived as an impractical evaluation methodology for most mHealth apps.

 

A Mobile, Avatar-Based App for Improving Body Perceptions Among Adolescents: A Pilot Test

 

1College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, United States
2Ira A Fulton School of Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, United States
3School of Nutrition and Health Promotion, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, United States
4Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, United States

Corresponding Author:
Annmarie A Lyles, RN, PhD

 

College of Nursing and Health Innovation
Arizona State University
​550 N 3rd St
Phoenix, AZ, 85004
United States

Phone: 1 602 496 2196
Fax:1 602 496 1128
Email: Annmarie.Lyles [at] asu.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: One barrier to effectively treating weight issues among adolescents is that they tend to use social comparison instead of objective measures to evaluate their own health status. When adolescents correctly perceive themselves as overweight, they are more likely to adopt healthy lifestyle behaviors

.